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Accreditation - Training Providers / Re: accreditation
« Last post by fiksblauw on February 14, 2020, 01:11:53 PM »
Hi I am Fikile
I am a qualified SETA Accredited Train the Trainer and would like to register as an accredited training provider, how do I go about doing that, the process and registration?
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THE LIST OF REGISTERED PRIVATE COLLEGES UPDATED ON 27 JANUARY 2020

INTRODUCTION
The register comprises of section A and B. Section A shows, among others, the registration status of private colleges, accredited qualifications and their NQF Levels. Section B lists all private colleges whose provisional or full registration has been cancelled due to reasons indicated therein. This information is updated on a regular basis.
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LIST OF PRIVATE SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROVIDERS THAT HAVE LODGED APPLICATIONS TO BE REGISTERED AS PRIVATE COLLEGES WITH THE DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING UPDATED ON 28 January 2020]

INTRODUCTION
Section 29 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Constitution) provides that everyone has the right to establish and maintain at their own expense a private educational institution as long as the independent institution:
(a) does not discriminate on the basis of race;
(b) is registered with the State; and
(c) maintains standards that are not inferior to standards comparable to public education institutions.

Previously the private SDPs could not be registered with the Department because the Skills Development Act (SDA), 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998), as amended, in its current form does not provide for registration of SDPs but requires them to be accredited in order to operate legally in South Africa. In order to fulfil the provision of Section 29(3) of the Constitution, a Joint Communiqué 1 of 2016: The Registration and Accreditation for Private Education Providers Offering Qualifications and Part-Qualifications on the Occupational Qualifications Sub- Framework was promulgated in October 2016. This Joint Communiqué calls on all SDPs to lodge their applications for registration as private colleges with the Department of Higher Education and Training.

This list provides the public with information on the Skillls Development Providers (SDPs):
 that have lodged applications to be registered as private colleges with the Department of Higher Education and Training. The list shows the names, contact details and physical addresses of the SDPs in question; and
 that have been accredited by the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations (QCTO) or its delegated agencies;

Important to note is the following:
 These SDPs must still comply with the legislation by displaying their accreditations conspicuously and be able to produce them on demand to any person with interest; and They must continue to offer education and training with valid accreditations until their applications for registration have been determined by the Registrar of Private Colleges.
The public is advised to check the validity of the accreditation of these SDPs with QCTO) or its delegated agencies.
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Government Gazette: 7 February February 2020 No. 43007, Page 7

"SDPs are no longer required to lodge applications for registration with Department as private colleges or private higher education institutions as contemplated in the Joint Communiqué 1 of 2016;"

DHET list of Private Skills Development Providers, dated 28 January on their website states:

"Previously the private SDPs could not be registered with the Department because the Skills Development Act (SDA), 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998), as amended, in its current form does not provide for registration of SDPs but requires them to be accredited in order to operate legally in South Africa. In order to fulfil the provision of Section 29(3) of the Constitution, a Joint Communiqué 1 of 2016: The Registration and Accreditation for Private Education Providers Offering Qualifications and Part-Qualifications on the Occupational Qualifications Sub-Framework was promulgated in October 2016. This Joint Communiqué calls on all SDPs to lodge their applications for registration as private colleges with the Department of Higher Education and Training."
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https://businesstech.co.za/news/business/370656/south-africas-big-employment-equity-shake-up-is-coming/

South African businesses need to prepare for the planned amendments to the Employment Equity Act (EEA) which promise a number of significant changes to the country’s employment equity laws.

Announced by Labour minister Thulas Nxesi in July 2019, the amendment bill will regulate the setting of sector-specific employment targets to address the gross under-representation of blacks, women and persons with disabilities.

It will also ensure that an employment equity certificate of compliance becomes a precondition for access to state contracts.

John Botha, chief operating officer of Global Business Solutions, said that individual businesses need to be aware of how their specific sectors will be impacted.

“For example, the proposed construction Industry sectoral targets will have to be achieved by 2025 by organisations in this sector,” he said.

“This means that they will have to review their employment policies and procedures, conduct better workforce planning based on anticipated workforce movement and capacitate their employment equity committees and line managers to ensure adherence to re-aligned employment equity plans.

“In addition to these sectoral targets, the Employment Equity Plans also have to address the analysis, interpretation and remediation of income differentials across occupational levels and in terms of the vertical inequality or Gini Index of an organisation,” he said.

Botha said that these amendments – which should be implemented by the end Q2 of 2020 at the latest – are a response to slow levels of transformation evidenced in the statistics gathered from more than 27,000 reporting employers.

A draft version of the bill published at the end of 2018 indicated that the changes being were made to speed up transformation.

The bill states that while the public sector has seen significant changes, the private sector continues to lag behind.

“It has been 20 years since the inception of the Employment Equity Act, however the pace of transformation has been slow,” the bill states.

“Relative to the demographics of the Economically Active Population (EAP) as released by StatsSA, marginal progress in relation to the equitable representation of the designated groups, in particular Africans, coloureds and persons with disabilities have been made in the middle-to-upper occupational levels, which is repeatedly visible in the statistics contained in all the Commission for Employment Equity (CEE) annual reports.”
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Accreditation - Training Providers / Re: accreditation
« Last post by Z@khele7 on January 27, 2020, 07:52:51 PM »
means the certification, usually for a particular period of time, of a person, a body or an institution as having the capacity to fulfil a particular function in the quality assurance system set up by the South African Qualifications Authority in terms of the Act;
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Education and Training Quality Assurance Body means a body accredited in terms of section 5(1)(a)(ii) of the Act, responsible for monitoring and auditing achievements in terms of national standards or qualifications, and to which specific functions relating to the monitoring and auditing of national standards or qualifications have been assigned in terms of section 5(1)(b)(i) of the Act;
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Accreditation - Training Providers / Re: Become SETA Accredited Training Provider
« Last post by Z@khele7 on January 27, 2020, 07:51:48 PM »
Is this certification program still available by any chance?
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QCTO / 11102019 QCTO Presentation October 2019
« Last post by ETQA Administrator on November 02, 2019, 07:06:50 AM »
11102019 QCTO Presentation October 2019
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Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology, Dr Blade Nzimande, MP, has authorised NSFAS to open the 2020 application season for student funding from September 01, to November 30, 2019.

To qualify for government funding for university and TVET college studies, the applicant should have the following:




1.           Be a South African citizen
2.           Register at any of the 26 public universities; and 50 TVET colleges
3.           Come from a family with an income of below R350 000 per annum (combined)

Students with disabilities and students who are beneficiaries of social grants automatically qualifies for NSFAS. Students who wish to study for post-graduate studies do not qualify for NSFAS. However, we encourage them to seek funding from the National Skill Fund and the National Research Foundation.

In order to engage learners at high school, NSFAS will be employing 200 NSFAS unemployed graduate from covering the country to support the application process. These graduates will visit the high schools, and rural communities where there are no computers and internet connectivity to assist students.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2ZoWppl6BLI

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