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SETA / SETA contact Details
« Last post by ETQA Administrator on June 08, 2017, 05:07:09 PM »
AGRISETA        
Agriculture Sector Education and Training Authority    
www.agriseta.co.za       
Tel: (012) 301 5600            
info@agriseta.co.za     

BANKSETA        
Banking Sector Education and Training Authority        
www.bankseta.org.za     
Tel:011 805 9661        

CATHSSETA        
Culture, Arts, Tourism, Hospitality and Sports Sector Education and Training Authority      
www.cathsseta.org.za     
Tel: (011) 217 0600      
info@cathsseta.org.za 

CETA        
Construction Education and Training Authority   
www.ceta.co.za         
Tel:  011 265 5900            
CeceliaG@ceta.co.za         

CHIETA        
Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority
www.chieta.org.za            
Tel:  011 628 7000        
headoffice@chieta.org.za - info@chieta.org.za     

EWSETA        
Energy and Water Sector Education and Training Authority
wwww.eseta.org.za            
Tel: (011) 274 4700        
info@eseta.org.za     

ETDP SETA
Education Training Development Practices Authority
www.etdpseta.org.za
Tel: (011) 028 7250 TOLL Free No: 0800 ETDP 73
info@etdpseta.org.za

FASSET   
Financial and Accounting Services Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.fasset.org.za       
Tel: (011) 476 8570        
fassetcallcentre@fasset.org.za     

FP&MSETA        
Fibre Processing Manufacturing Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.fpmseta.org.za         
Tel:  011-403 1700 - 086 101 0001     
fassetcallcentre@fasset.org.za - info@fpmseta.org.za       

FOODBEV        
Food and Beverages Manufacturing Industry Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.foodbev.co.za       
Tel:  011 253 7300        
info@foodbev.co.za     

HWSETA        
Health and Welfare Sector Education and Training Authority      
www.hwseta.org.za     
Tel:  011 607 6900         
hwseta@hwseta.org.za     

INSETA        
Insurance Sector Education and Training Authority     
www.inseta.org.za         
Tel:  0861 130 013 - 011 381 8900        
insetacallcentre@inseta.org.za       

LGSETA        
Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority
www.lgseta.co.za              
Tel:  (011) 456 8579        
learnerships@lgseta.co.za     

MERSETA        
Manufacturing, Engineering and Related Services Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.merseta.org.za         
Tel: 010 219 3000        

MICT        
Media, Information and Communication Technologies Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.mict.org.za        
Tel: 011 207 2600/03
ceo@mict.org.za    
   
MQA        
Mining Qualifications Authority        
www.mqa.org.za   
Tel:  011 547 260        
info@mqa.org.za         

PSETA        
Public Service Sector Education and Training Authority      
www.pseta.org.za   
Tel: 012 423 5700     
Communications@pseta.org.za         

SASSETA         
Safety and Security Sector Education & Training Authority   
www.sasseta.org.za       
Tel: (011) 087 5500   
callcentre@sasseta.org.za     

SERVICES SETA        
Services Sector Education and Training Authority
www.serviceseta.org.za            
Tel: (011 276 9600        
customer@serviceseta.org.za     

TETA        
Transport Education and Training Authority
www.teta.org.za            
Tel:  (011) 577-7000/ 7040 - (011) 038 9155           
webadministrator@teta.org.za     

W&RSETA        
Wholesale and Retail Sector Education and Training Authority   
www.wrseta.org.za         
Tel:  012 622 9500 - 0860 270 027     
wrseta@wrseta.org.za     


3
DHET - department of Higher Education and Training / Re: Open learning
« Last post by Nieman on May 24, 2017, 08:07:02 AM »
Open learning: An educational approach which combines the principles of learner-centredness, lifelong learning, flexibility of learning provision, the removal of barriers to access learning, the recognition for credit of pri or learning  experience,  the  provision  of  learner  support,  the  construction  of  learning  programmes  in  the expectation that learners can succeed, and the maintenance of rigorous quality assurance over the design of learning materials and support systems.

I believe open learning like this is the best way to learn.
4
Sorry about the extra sss in my earlier subject line!
5
 ???

I am somewhat concerned with several rather subjective statements that appear in this article, which I will list below, and then motivate an alternative objective approach:

"What we want students to learn and be able to do ..."

"... focusing their efforts on learning what we believe is important."
[/i]

Firstly, we should be student/learner-focused, depending on the various learning styles they exhibit or prefer - or we risk frustrating them and putting them at a distinct disadvantage. This goes for both learning content, mode/medium, and assessment type/methodology.

Secondly, at a generic level, what learners need to learn is prescribed by the department or organisation - not ourselves.

Thirdly, what they need to learn is governed by Unit Standards, enterprise standards, legislation, and other specific guidelines - not our's.

We need to shift from a me/teacher/facilitator/guru-focus to a student/learner-focus

What our target audience should be learning, are complementary skills and supplementary knowledge that they need to progress to either the next level of learning or apply in their respective working environments.

This means first of all assessing and determining each candidate's baseline entry skill and knowledge levels. This will ensure that you do not bore them with inputs they are already familiar with or have previously mastered. It will also ensure their buy-in and undivided attention, as your inputs will link to their prior understanding, and take them forward into new and relevant areas.

The same principles should apply when assessing their competence and mastery, so that we offer a seamless entry-to-end approach and process that is congruent with this methodology.

Thank you for presenting the revised Bloom Taxonomy, as this serves as a useful guideline when generating appropriate items :-*.
6
Assessments should provide us, the instructors, and the students with evidence of how well the students have learned what we intend them to learn. What we want students to learn and be able to do should guide the choice and design of the assessment. There are two major reasons for aligning assessments with learning objectives. First, alignment increases the probability that we will provide students with the opportunities to learn and practice the knowledge and skills that will be required on the various assessments we design. Second, when assessments and objectives are aligned, “good grades” are more likely to translate into “good learning”. When objectives and assessments are misaligned, many students will focus their efforts on activities that will lead to good grades on assessments, rather than focusing their efforts on learning what we believe is important.

There are many different types of activities that can be used to assess students’ proficiency on a given learning objective, and the same activity can be used to assess different objectives. To ensure more accurate assessment of student proficiencies, it is recommended that you use different kinds of activities so that students have multiple ways to practice and demonstrate their knowledge and skills.

When deciding on what kind of assessment activities to use, it is helpful to keep in mind the following questions:

What will the student’s work on the activity (multiple choice answers, essays, project, presentation, etc) tell me about their level of competence on the targeted learning objectives?
How will my assessment of their work help guide students’ practice and improve the quality of their work?
How will the assessment outcomes for the class guide my teaching practice?
This table presents examples of the kinds of activities that can be used to assess different types of learning objectives, and the ways that we can analyze or measure performance to produce useful feedback for teaching and learning. The categorization of learning objectives is taken from the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Type of Learning Objective   Examples of Types of Assessment   How to Measure
Remember
Students will be able to:
recall
recognize
Objective Test items that require students to recall or recognize information:
Fill-in the Blank
Multiple Choice items with question stems such as, “what is a…”, or “which of the following is the definition of)
Labeling diagrams
Reciting (orally, musically, or in writing)
Accuracy – correct vs number of errors
Item Analysis (at the class level, are there items that had higher error rates? Did some items result in the same errors?)
Understand
Students will be able to:
interpret
exemplify
classify
summarize
infer
compare
explain
Papers, oral/written exam questions, problems, class discussions, concept maps, homework assignments that require (oral or written):

Summarizing readings, films, speeches, etc.
Comparing and/or contrasting two or more theories, events, processes, etc.
Classifying or categorizing cases, elements, events, etc., using established criteria
 Paraphrasing documents or speeches
Finding or identifying examples or illustrations of a concept, principle
Scoring or performance rubrics that identify critical components of the work and discriminates between differing levels of proficiency in addressing the components
Apply
Students will be able to:
execute
implement
Activities that require students to use procedures to solve or complete familiar or unfamiliar tasks; may also require students to determine which procedure(s) are most appropriate for a given task.  Activities include:
Problem sets, performances, labs, Prototyping, Simulations   Accuracy scores, Check lists, Rubrics, Primary Trait Analysis
Analyze
Students will be able to:
differentiate
organize
attribute
Activities that require students to discriminate or select relevant from irrelevant parts, determine how elements function together, or determine bias, values or underlying intent in presented materials. These might include:
Case studies, Critiques, Labs, Papers, Projects, Debates, Concept Maps,   
Rubrics, scored by instructor, juries, external clients, employers, internship supervisor, etc.
Primary Trait Analysis
Evaluate
Students will be able to:
check
critique
A range of activities that require students to test, monitor, judge or critique readings, performances, or products against established criteria or standards.  These activities might include:
Journals, Diaries, Critiques, Problem Sets, Product Reviews, Case Studies.   
Rubrics, scored by instructor, juries, external clients, employers, internship supervisor, etc.
Primary Trait Analysis
Create
Students will be able to:
generate
plan
produce
Research projects, musical compositions, performances, essays, business plans, website designs, prototyping, set designs   
Rubrics, scored by instructor, juries, external clients, employers, internship supervisor, etc.
Primary Trait Analysis
7
When considering assessment methods, it is particularly useful to think first about what qualities or abilities you are seeking to engender in the learners.
1. Thinking critically and making judgements
(Developing arguments, reflecting, evaluating, assessing, judging)
•   Essay
•   Report
•   Journal
•   Letter of Advice to …. (about policy, public health matters …..)
•   Present a case for an interest group
•   Prepare a committee briefing paper for a specific meeting
•   Book review (or article) for a particular journal
•   Write a newspaper article for a foreign newspaper
•   Comment on an article’s theoretical perspective
2. Solving problems and developing plans
(Identifying problems, posing problems, defining problems, analysing data, reviewing, designing experiments, planning, applying information)
•   Problem scenario
•   Group Work
•   Work-based problem
•   Prepare a committee of enquiry report
•   Draft a research bid to a realistic brief
•   Analyse a case
•   Conference paper (or notes for a conference paper plus annotated bibliography)
3. Performing procedures and demonstrating techniques
(Computation, taking readings, using equipment, following laboratory procedures, following protocols, carrying out instructions)
•   Demonstration
•   Role Play
•   Make a video (write script and produce/make a video)
•   Produce a poster
•   Lab report
•   Prepare an illustrated manual on using the equipment, for a particular audience
•   Observation of real or simulated professional practice
4. Managing and developing oneself
(Working co-operatively, working independently, learning independently, being self-directed, managing time, managing tasks, organising)
•   Journal
•   Portfolio
•   Learning Contract
•   Group work
5. Accessing and managing information
(Researching, investigating, interpreting, organising information, reviewing and paraphrasing information, collecting data, searching and managing information
•   sources, observing and interpreting)
•   Annotated bibliography
•   Project
•   Dissertation
•   Applied task
•   Applied problem
6. Demonstrating knowledge and understanding
(Recalling, describing, reporting, recounting, recognising, identifying, relating & interrelating)
•   Written examination
•   Oral examination
•   Essay
•   Report
•   Comment on the accuracy of a set of records
•   Devise an encyclopaedia entry
•   Produce an A – Z of …
•   Write an answer to a client’s question
Short answer questions: True/False/ Multiple Choice Questions (paper-based or computer-aided-assessment)
7. Designing, creating, performing
(Imagining, visualising, designing, producing, creating, innovating, performing)
•   Portfolio
•   Performance
•   Presentation
•   Hypothetical
•   Projects
8. Communicating
(One and two-way communication; communication within a group, verbal, written and non-verbal communication. Arguing, describing, advocating, interviewing, negotiating, presenting; using specific written forms)
•   Written presentation (essay, report, reflective paper etc.)
•   Oral presentation
•   Group work
•   Discussion/debate/role play
•   Participate in a ‘Court of Enquiry’
•   Presentation to camera
•   Observation of real or simulated professional practice
•   Variety in assessment
It is interesting to note that the eight learning outcomes listed above would be broadly expected of any graduating learner from a higher education program. Yet, when choosing assessment items, we tend to stay with the known or the ‘tried and true methods’, because they seem to have the ring of academic respectability, or possibly because it was the way we were assessed as undergraduates ourselves.

8
Employment Equity / Employment Equity Act Amendment, dated 28 April 2017
« Last post by ETQA Administrator on April 28, 2017, 04:18:17 PM »
Find below a summary of the amended Employment Equity Act, dated 28 April 2017

Code of Good Practice on the  Preparation, Implementation and Monitoring of Employment Equity Plan, as outlined in this  schedule.

1.   OBJECTIVE
The objective of this Code is to provide guidelines  on good practice, in terms of the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, 1998 (Act No. 55 of 1998) as amended (hereafter  referred to as the Act), for the preparation,  implementation and monitoring  of an employment  equity plan (hereafter  referred to as the EE plan)

   a)    This Code applies to all employers  that are required to prepare and implement an EE Plan in terms of the Act.
   b)    Designated  employers  should, in consultation  with their employees,  apply the guidelines  as set out in this Code to prepare, implement  and monitor their EE Plans.
   c)    Their employment  equity plans, taking into account the specific circumstances of their organization(s).
   d)    An EE Plan prepared in line with this Code would enable employers  to ensure that their human resource policies, procedures  and practices are based on non- discrimination and reflect employment  equity principles  for accessing and commencing employment, during employment  and upon  termination  of employment.
   e)    This Code is intended to guide employers  in the preparation,  implementation and monitoring  of their EE Plans. It is intended to provide guidelines  to employers  to consider and apply appropriately to their circumstances.

2.   LEGAL FRAMEWORK
2.1    This Code is issued in terms of section 54 of the Employment Equity Act and must be read in conjunction  with the Act and other Codes issued in terms of the Act1.
2.2    The Code should also be read in conjunction  with the Constitution  of South
Africa and all relevant legislation,  including the:
2.2.1    Employment Equity Act, No. 55, of 1998;
2.2.2    Employment Equity Amendment  Act, No. 47 of 2013;
2.2.3   Employment Equity Regulations  of 2014 as amended;
2.2.4    Labour Relations Act, No. 66 of 1995 as amended;
2.2.5    Basic Conditions  of Employment Act, No.75 of 1997 as amended;
2.2.6    Skills Development Act, No. 97 of 1998 as amended;
2.2.7    Skills Development Levies Act, No. 9 of 1999 as amended;
2.2.8    Promotion  of Equality and Prevention  of Unfair Discrimination Act, No. 4 of 2000 as amended;
2.2.9    Employment Services Act, Act No. 4 of 2014 as amended;  and
2.2.10    Broad Based Black Economic  Empowerment Act, No. 53 of 2003 as amended.

3.   SCOPE

3.1    This Code is relevant to all employers  that are regarded as designated employers  in terms of the Act, including those employers  who choose to voluntarily  comply.
3.2    Designated  employers  and their employees  should apply the guidelines  set out in this Code to prepare, implement  and monitor their EE Plans, taking into account the specific circumstances of their organizations.

4.   PURPOSE  AND RATIONALE OF THE EE PLAN
4.1    The EE Plan is a designated  employer’s  implementation programme  to achieve equitable representation and fair treatment of the designated  groups (i.e. Black people, women and persons with disabilities)  in the workplace  across all occupational levels.
4.2    The EE Plan addresses the barriers to fair employment  practices, i.e. access and treatment in the policies and procedures  identified in the consultation  and the employment  equity analysis process through remedial measures in terms of policies, procedures  and practices and the working environment to ensure the equitable representation of the designated  groups in the workplace  within set timeframes.

5.   STRUCTURE OF THE EE PLAN
5.1    The EE Plan must meet all the requirements of Section 20 of the Act.
5.2    The EE Plan must be developed using the EEA13 form contained in the Employment Equity Regulations of 2014, as amended.
5.3    The EE Plan must be informed by the analysis (EEA12) and as a minimum contain all the information required by EEA13 form in the regulations.

6.   PROCESS FOR CONSTRUCTING PLAN
a)    The development of an EE Plan must be an inclusive process that involves consultation and is informed by:
     i)    an analysis of the workforce;
     ii)    analysis of the policies, procedures and practices; and
     iii)    analysis of the work environment and diversity management experience.
b)    Three phases are usually involved in relation to the EE Plan, i.e. the preparation phase, the implementation phase and the monitoring phase.
6.1    PREPARATION PHASE
6.1.1    INITIATOR TO STEER THE PROCESS, INCLUDING THE ASSIGNMENT OF ONE OR MORE SENIOR MANAGERS
a)    An employer must initiate and steer the process for the preparation of an EE Plan, which could be assigning such responsibility to a permanent employee that reports directly to the Chief Executive
Officer 2 (CEO) / Accounting Officer.
b)    Notwithstanding the CEO / Accounting Officer is deemed to be the accounting officer for the implementation of the Act, the board
may nevertheless agree on employment equity outcomes for the CEO / Accounting Officer.
   c)    The CEO / Accounting Officer may, particularly in the case involving a small workforce, assume the responsibility to initiate and steer the process for the development, implementation and monitoring of the EE Plan.
   d)    The CEO / Accounting  Officer may, particularly  in the case involving a large workforce,  assign the responsibility for initiating the process for the development, implementation and monitoring of the EE Plan to senior managers.
   e)    One or more senior managers who are assigned the responsibility for the implementation and monitoring  of EE Plans should be included from the preparation  phase of the process.
   f)    The employer must -
      i.  provide the assigned managers with the necessary  authority and means, such as an appropriate  budget, to perform their allocated functions;  and
      ii.  take reasonable  steps to ensure that these managers perform their allocated functions by incorporating key employment equity outcomes in their performance contracts.
6.1.2    COMMUNICATION, AWARENESS AND CONSULTATION
When communicating on matters concerning  employment  equity, it is important  to take special care that the content is communicated in clear and easily understood  language to provide the entire workforce  reasonable opportunity  to grasp the content and subsequent  rights.
6.1.2.1 All employees  should be made aware and informed of –
   a)    The objectives,  content and application  of the Act, its regulations and Codes of good practice in preparation  for their participation, including consultation.
   b)    Matters relating to the identification, prohibition  and elimination  of unfair discrimination and affirmative  action to achieve equality and diversity in the workplace.
   c)    The proposed process to be followed by the employer.
   d)    The advantages  to employees  for participation in the process. e)    The need for the involvement  of all stakeholders  in order to promote positive outcomes.
6.1.2.2 Employers  must consult with employees,  both from designated  and non-designated groups at all occupational levels in the organization, when conducting  an analysis, preparing and implementing a plan and when submitting  employment  equity reports to the Department  of Labour.
6.1.2.3 Managers should be informed of their obligations in terms of the Act, and training should be provided to them where particular skills do not exist, e.g. diversity management, coaching and mentoring.
6.1.2.4 Communication on employment equity should focus on positive outcomes, including the better utilization of all of the employer’s human resources and the creation of a diverse and more productive workforce.
6.1.2.5 Consultation with employees should commence as early as possible in the process, which should involve:
   a)    An employer establishing a consultative forum or using an existing forum to consult with employees on employment equity matters.
   b)    Employee representatives and trade unions reflecting the interests of employees from both designated and non-designated groups and across all occupational levels of the workforce.
   c)    Where the employer does not have representatives from a specific group, a member of the forum can be assigned to represent the interest of such groupings/ constituency until such time a representative is nominated.
   d)    Representative trade unions, where these exist, or representatives nominated by such trade unions must be included in the consultation process.
   e)    The employer should be represented by one or more members of senior management in the forum.
6.1.2.6 Consultation would include-
   a)    Reasonable opportunity for employee representatives to meet with the employer to consult on the conducting of an analysis, development of a plan and the submitting of reports to the Department of Labour.
   b)    The opportunity for both employer and employee representatives to provide feedback to their respective constituencies.
   c)    The request, receipt and consideration of relevant information. d)    The allocation of adequate time for each of the steps to be completed.
6.1.2.7 Regular (at least quarterly), structured and scheduled meetings must be held and the deliberations properly recorded to ensure a constructive and well-informed process.
6.1.2.8 Employee  representatives must be allowed time to effectively participate  in the consultation  process.
6.1.2.9 The disclosure  of relevant information  by designated  employers  is vital for the successful  implementation of the EE Plan, which should include-
   (a)   the extent to which suitably qualified people from and amongst the different designated  groups are equitably represented  within each occupational level in that employer’s  workforce  in relation to the demographic profile of the national and regional (provincial) economically active population.
   (b)  steps taken by a designated  employer to train suitably qualified people from the designated  groups.
   (c)   steps to be taken by a designated  employer to recruit and promote persons from the designated  groups to implement  its EE Plan.
   (d)  the extent to which the designated  employer has made progress in eliminating  employment  barriers that adversely affect people from designated  groups.
   (e)   steps taken by an employer to appoint and retain suitably qualified people from the designated  groups.
   (f)   steps taken by the designated  employer to provide reasonable accommodation for suitably qualified people from the designated groups.
6.1.2.10 Where a representative or trade union refuses to take part in the consultation  process, the employer should record the circumstances in writing and a copy of this document  should be provided to the representative or trade union concerned.
6.1.3    CONDUCTING AN ANALYSIS (contained  in EEA12 of regulations)
Conducting  of an analysis must be done in accordance  with the EEA12 form of the Employment Equity Regulations  of 2014, as amended.   All areas of the EEA12 form template must remain, but the employer may add other areas, including columns and rows, in order to meet the objectives  of the Act.
6.1.3.1 The purpose of the analysis is –
   a)   To determine  the extent of under-representation of employees,  i.e. both permanent  and temporary3 workers, from the designated  groups in the different occupational levels of the employer’s  workforce  in terms of race, gender and disability.
   b)   To assess all employment  policies, procedures  and practices, and the working environment in order to –
      (i)   Identify any barriers that may contribute  to the under-representation or under-utilization of employees  from the designated  groups;
      (ii)  Identify any barriers or factors that may contribute  to the lack of Affirmation  of diversity in the workplace;
      (iii) Identify other employment  conditions  that may adversely affect designated  groups; and
      (iv) Identify practices or factors that positively  promote employment equity and diversity in the workplace,  including reasonable accommodation.
6.1.3.2 Workforce  profile
a)    The first step in conducting  an analysis of the workforce  profile is to differentiate  between employees  of the various groups, both in terms of the designated  (i.e. Blacks, women and persons with disabilities)  and non- designated  groups by using the EEA1 form, contained  in the regulations, for employees  to declare their status.
   b)    Existing and/or historical information  may be used to assist to verify an employee’s  status.
   c)    An analysis of the workforce  profile should provide a comparison  of designated  groups using up-to-date  demographic data in terms of their economically active population  and their representation at the various occupational levels, which is contained  in the regulations  as Form EEA8 for demographic information  and EEA9 form for information distinguishing between the various occupational levels.
   d)    The analysis of the workforce  profile must be based on a snapshot of each occupational level on a particular date in terms of race, gender and disability,  and per occupational level on a particular date.
   e)    The under-representation or over-representation of a particular group, whether designated  or non-designated, must be captured in the analysis and used to inform and prioritize strategies in the EE plan to address the under-representation.
   f)    Recruitment  strategies may vary depending  upon the level of responsibility and the degree of specialization of the occupation,  usually the higher the degree of responsibility or specialization required for the job, the broader the recruitment  strategy.
6.1.3.3 Review of employment policies, practices,  procedures, and working environment
The review should include a critical examination  of all established  policies, practices, procedures  and the working environment to identify barriers that directly or indirectly   impede one or more of the designated  groups’ equitable representation in the workplace,  including those relating to -
   a)    Recruitment, selection, pre-employment testing and induction,  promotion, development and retention.
   b)    Succession  and experience  planning, promotions  and transfers. c)    Job assignments  and training opportunities.
   d)    Performance and remuneration, including equal pay for work of equal value4.
   e)    Discipline  and dispute resolution.
   f)    Working conditions,  including the accommodation of cultural, religious and other diversity differences.
   g)    Reasonable  accommodation, including for persons with disabilities h)    Corporate  culture.
   i)    Any other policy, procedure  or practice that may arise from the consultation  process.

7.   DEVELOPING THE EE PLAN
The employer must consult and attempt to reach consensus  on the development of the EE Plan (EEA13) by taking the following  into account-
   a)    Analysis report (EEA12).
   b)    National and provincial  Economically Active Population  (EAP)
   c)    Determining the duration of the EE Plan.
   d)    Determining the annual objectives  of the EE Plan.
   e)    Corrective  measures formulated,  including goals and targets. f)    Time frames established.
   g)    The EE Plan drawn up in terms of section 20 of the Act.
   h)    Resources  identified and allocated for the implementation of the EE Plan. i)    The EE Plan communicated.
7.1  Analysis Report
7.1.1   An employer must consult and attempt to reach reasonable  consensus  on the under-representation of the designated  groups and the barriers they identified in the analysis report. The analysis report must be used to prioritize the targeted designated  groups in accordance  with their representation.
7.1.2   The analysis report must be used to determine  and inform the affirmative  action measures,  including strategies,  which would be included in the EE Plan as a response to barriers identified in policies, procedures  and practices.
7.2  Duration  of EE Plan
An employer should take the following  into consideration when determining  the duration of an EE Plan:
   a)    the EE Plan must not be shorter than one year and not longer than five years. b)    workforce  size.
   c)    nature and location of workplace,  including geographic  spread.
   d)    the time needed to implement  affirmative  measures to achieve numerical  and non-numerical goals as outlined in the EE Plan.
   e)    the start and end date of the EE Plan must be specific in terms of the day, month and the year.
   f)    An employer’s  business/strategic plan.
7.3  Objectives  of the EE Plan
In determining  the annual objectives  for the EE Plan, the following  must be taken into account:
   a)    The purpose or overall objective of the Act is to achieve equitable representation of the designated  groups in the workplace  that is free from unfair discrimination.
   b)    The objectives  in the EE Plan must be specific, measurable,  achievable,  relevant and time bound (SMART).
   c)    Broader objectives  of the business.
   d)    Prioritizing  and resource availability  and allocation.
7.4  Numerical  goals and numerical  targets
   a)    Numerical  goals are the entire workforce  profile in terms of race, gender and disability,  and not the difference  between the current workforce  profile and the projected workforce  profile the employer seeks to achieve at the end employment  equity plan (EE Plan).
   b)    The numerical  targets are the entire workforce  profile in terms of race, gender and disability,  and not the difference  between the current workforce  profile and the projected workforce  profile the employer seeks to achieve by the next reporting period.
   c)    The numerical  goals and the annual numerical  targets must be informed by the outcome of the analysis and prioritized  and weighted more towards the designated  groups that are most under-represented in terms of the national and provincial  economically active population,  in terms of section 42 of the Act.
   d)    Planned vacancies  and natural attrition (such as resignations, promotions  and retirements)  must be taken into consideration when determining  numerical  goals and targets.
7.5  Affirmative  action measures
7.5.1  An employer must implement  affirmative  action measures in response to barriers identified in the analysis report (EEA12) to ensure that suitably qualified people from the designated  groups have equal employment  opportunities and are equitably represented  in all occupational levels in the workforce,  including
   (a)   measures to identify and eliminate employment  barriers that adversely affect people from designated  groups, directly or indirectly.
   (b)  measures to further diversity  and the management of diversity in the workplace.
   (c)   reasonable  accommodation for suitably qualified people from designated groups, including for persons with disabilities.
   (d)  measures to recruit, promote, retain and develop people from designated groups, including skills development and skills transfer.
   (e)   measures that include preferential  treatment,  numerical  goals and measures other than numerical  goals, but exclude quotas or the creation of absolute barriers.
7.5.2  All corrective  measures to eliminate any barriers identified during the analysis must be specified in the EE Plan.
7.6    Consensus
   a)    The employer must consult and attempt to reach consensus  on the annual objectives  and corrective  measures contained  in the EE Plan.
   b)    Where consensus  is not reached on a particular item in the EE Plan, the reasons related thereto must be recorded and attempts must be made to resolve them through the dispute resolution  mechanisms  outlined in the EE Plan.
7.7    Resources
Resources  must be appropriately allocated, including human resources,  financial resources and material resources.
7.8    Assignment  of responsibility
The person in the workforce,  including senior managers,  responsible  for monitoring  and implementing the EE Plan must take into account:
   a)    The size of the organization. b)    Line functions.
   c)    Geographic  location and spread. d)    Feedback requirements.
   e)    Responsibility and authority of the person.
7.9  Dispute Resolution
   a)    Internal procedures  for resolving any dispute about the interpretation and implementation of the EE Plan should be agreed and specified in the EE Plan.
   b)    The last point of call for the resolving of any disputes about the interpretation and implementation of the EE Plan should be the Chief Executive  Officer (CEO) / Accounting  Officer of the organization.
   c)    Existing dispute resolution  procedures  could be used or tailored to resolve disputes concerning  the interpretation and implementation of the EE Plan.
   d)    Where a dispute still remains after the internal dispute resolution  processes were followed, a party to the dispute may make an application  to the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation  and Arbitration  (CCMA) or the Labour Court.
   e)    Procedures  must be time-bound,  cost effective and simple for designated  and non-designated employees  to follow.
7.10   Monitoring  and Evaluating  the EE Plan
   a) The person(s) responsible  for the monitoring  and evaluation  of the EE Plan and the process to be followed, including the CEO / Accounting  Officer and the Board, must be outlined in the EE Plan.
   b) Regular meetings must be held and records of progress reports must be kept to effectively  monitor and evaluate the implementation of the EE Plan, which where applicable  should include the CEO / Accounting  Officer and the Board.
   c) Indicators  for the monitoring  and evaluation  of the EE Plan must be predefined and agreed upon prior to the implementation of the EE Plan.
   d) The outcome of the monitoring  and evaluation  process must inform strategies to implement  the EE Plan and for the preparation  of successive  plans to start at least six months prior to the expiry of the current EE Plan.
   e) The EE Plan may only be reviewed if there is a major event or restructuring during its duration.
7.11   Communication
Communication of the EE Plan must be informed by a communication strategy that takes the following  into account:
   a) The mechanisms  available to communicate, including print and electronic.
   b) Various ways to communicate with different target groups, e.g. persons with disabilities.
   c) The content of the EE Plan.
   d) The persons responsible  for implementing the EE Plan.
   e) The manner in which disputes on the implementation and interpretation of the EE Plan would be managed.
   f)  Availability  and accessibility  of the EE Plan, including to persons with disabilities.

8.   REPORTING
   a)   A designated  employer is expected to submit their employment  equity report to the Department  of Labour annually on the first working day of October or by a prescribed date for online reporting.
   b)   The employer must consult with its employees  or employee  representatives and union representatives through established  forum(s) prior to submitting  their EE Report to the Department  of Labour.
   c)   The EE Report must be used as a monitoring  and evaluation  tool to inform future implementation strategies and the preparation  of successive  plans.
   d)   EE Reports must reflect the progress made against the employer’s  current EE Plan.
   e)   EE Reports must be completed  by employers  using the EEA2 and EEA4 form contained  in the regulations.
   f)   Public companies  must include their workforce  profile in their financial report using the EEA10 form format contained  in the regulations.
9
MQASETA / MQA Funding Policy for 2017 - 2018
« Last post by ETQA Administrator on April 27, 2017, 02:44:55 PM »
MQA Funding Policy for 2017 - 2018
10
MQASETA / MQA BURSARY AND WORK EXPERIENCE POLICY
« Last post by ETQA Administrator on April 27, 2017, 02:41:29 PM »
MQA BURSARY AND WORK EXPERIENCE POLICY
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